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the genre's premiere review magazine for short SF & Fantasy since 1993
Articles


Collecting Fantasy Art #4: Art Mania!

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Emsh - The Great Explosion


Collecting Fantasy Art # 4:

Art Mania!


by

Robert Weinberg

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Collecting Fantasy Art #3: Meet Marty G.

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Robert Weinberg continues his personal look back at the earliest years of his almost four decades of collecting science-fiction and fantasy art with this third installment, which he titles “Meet Marty G.” Bob tells about getting art from some of the early practitioners of SF and Fantasy art, including Margaret Brundage, H.R. van Dongen, and Ed Valigursky. This installment introduces another major influence on Bob's collecting: Martin Greenberg. Once again, we thank Bob for providing this on-going historical perspective (which has all the earmarks of a book in the making somewhere down the road), and also for providing select pieces from his personal collection to enhance his fascinating narrative.

Margaret Brundage Mermaid paintingValigursky Fantastic June 1959

(Cover painting at left by Margaret Brundage. Cover at right by Ed Valigursky for Fantastic, June 1959.)


 Collecting Fantasy Art #3

Meet Marty G.

By Robert Weinberg

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Collecting Fantasy Art #2: Aces and Earls

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Robert Weinberg continues his personal look back at the earliest years of his almost four decades of collecting science-fiction and fantasy art with this second installment, which he titles "Aces and Earls." Bob recounts more of the valuable connections he made early on, including those of Sam Moskowitz and Gerry de la Ree, and how he came into possession of one of the largest finds in his collecting career. Once again, we thank Bob for providing this on-going historical perspective (which has all the earmarks of a book in the making somewhere down the road), and also for providing select pieces from his personal collection (an even dozen) to enhance his fascinating narrative.

(Cover painting at left by W. H. McCauley for Imagination, October 1954. Cover at right by Ed Valigursky for the first paperback edition of City.)

 

Collecting Fantasy Art #2


Aces and Earls


By Robert Weinberg

 

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Collecting Fantasy Art #1: Starting at Zero

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Once the decision had been made to add The Pulp Magazines category, the first person to come to mind for a possible article on the pulp magazine experience was Robert Weinberg (photo at left). We'd known of Bob's long experience with and love of the pulps but knew getting him to write an article for us--for free--was a long shot, for Bob is busier than ever these days. He not only is editor at the legendary publisher Arkham House, but edits collections on all manner of subjects and writes the occasional novel and short story as well. And rumor has it that he is working with Hollywood on some mysterious project. We were thus extremely pleased when Bob wrote to say that not only would he be happy to write the initially requested one article, but a series of them for us.

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An Unrepentant Skeptic -- Jeffery D. Kooistra

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Jeffery D. Kooistra is a science fiction writer, a free-lance physicist, and a father of three.  His opinions, observations, and cranky ideas appear in every other issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, in that magazine's "The Alternate View" feature.  He is a member of SIGMA, a collection of SF writers who do think-tanking and consulting as a public service (http://www.sigmaforum.org).  He's also a member of the high IQ Triple Nine Society (http://www.triplenine.org) which his family doesn't let him forget when he does something stupid.

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The Old Future, by Gregory Benford & Michael R. Rose

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Gregory Benford has published over twenty books, mostly novels. Nearly all remain in print, some after a quarter of a century. His fiction has won many awards, including the Nebula Award for his novel Timescape. A winner of the United Nations Medal for Literature, he is a professor of physics at the University of California, Irvine. He is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, was Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University, and in 1995 received the Lord Prize for contributions to science.

His 1999 analysis of what endures, Deep Time: How Humanity Communicates Across Millennia, has been widely read. A fellow of the American Physical Society and a member of the World Academy of Arts and Sciences, he continues his research in both astrophysics and plasma physics. Time allowing, he continues to write both fiction and nonfiction. Recently he began a series on science and society with biologist Michael Rose, published on the Internet at Amazon Shorts.com.

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The Coming Convergence by Stanley Schmidt

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Stanley Schmidt was born in Cincinnati and graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 1966. He began selling stories while a graduate student at Case Western Reserve University, where he completed his Ph.D. in physics in 1969. He continued freelancing while an assistant professor at Heidelberg College in Ohio, teaching physics, astronomy, science fiction, and other oddities. (He was introduced to his wife, Joyce, by a serpent while teaching field biology in a place vaguely resembling that well-known garden.) He has contributed numerous stories and articles to original anthologies and magazines including Analog, Asimov's, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Rigel, The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, American Journal of Physics, Camping Journal, Writer's Digest, and The Writer. He has edited or coedited about a dozen anthologies. Since 1978, as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, he has been nominated 30 times for the Hugo award for Best Professional Editor. He is a member of the Board of Advisers for the National Space Society and
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Remembering Robert Anson Heinlein

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ImageThis July marks the hundredth anniversary of Robert Anson Heinlein's birth, an event commemorated by The Heinlein Centennial, Inc., an independent group of Heinlein admirers, at the Robert A. Heinlein Centennial in Kansas City, Missouri. If all goes according to plan, a separate group, The Heinlein Society, plans to publish The Heinlein Centennial Reader later this year. (The winners of The Heinlein Centennial's story contest may be found at their website. The Heinlein Society has announced their short story contest, and they promise details will be available soon.)
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Hugo and I Go: Meandering Thoughts on a Few That Made the List, and Some That Didn’t

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Several years ago, I was proud to have seen enough of the films nominated for the Academy Awards to make an intelligent commentary on the merits of each. That has never happened again. And this year, as I perused the list of Hugo nominees, I sighed deeply and bemoaned the fact that there are so many things to read, and so little time. Tangent has reviewed all of the short fiction nominees, and no negative reflection on any of the works omitted from this discussion are intended.
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In The Science Fiction Ghetto

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ImageIt is all too easy for science fiction readers to forget that after all these years, despite all the blockbusters and bestsellers, despite the genre's shaping impact on every facet of our larger culture, the object of their affection has never really gone mainstream.

A modest corrective to the delusion that it has is reading David Langford's "Ansible Link" round-up of news items, a regular feature of Interzone which under the heading "As Others See Us" 
includes bits about the nonsense that people who should know better say about the genre.

One of the choicer comments on which Mr. Langford reports in the July 2007 issue is from Christopher Hitchens, who, in his review of The Life of Kingsley Amis by Zachary Leader for the May Atlantic Monthly, observes that "The great drawback of sci-fi is the dearth of sex from which it compels itself to suffer."
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